SleuthSayers: On Subplots & Multiple Points of View in the Short Story

SleuthSayers allowed me to step back in the rotation for a guest post on short stories—sparked by a couple of questions I’d seen online recently about incorporating subplots and multiple points of view in short fiction. Here’s the set-up on those questions:

Back over the holidays—just before Christmas, then just after the new year—a couple of questions online got me thinking about specific aspects of short story writing, how I teach students to write them, and how I write them myself. First, Amy Denton posted a question on the Sisters in Crime Guppies message board: “Depending on the length, is there enough room in a short story for a subplot?” Responses ranged widely, and the discussion was extensive, but with no clear consensus.

Then, reviewing a couple of short stories from a recent issue of Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, Catherine Dilts wrote, “A rule beginning writers encounter is that multiple points of view can’t be used effectively in short stories…. How does telling a tale through more than one narrator work?” A story by fellow SleuthSayer Robert Lopresti, “A Bad Day for Algebra Tests,” offered Dilts one example of how well that approach can succeed.

Read the full post here.

Share this:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *